Eczema is a skin condition caused by inflammation of the skin.
Typically, eczema causes skin to become itchy, red, and dry — even cracked and leathery. Eczema can appear on any part of the body.

Causes

Eczema runs in families. Certain genes can cause some people to have extra-sensitive skin. An overactive immune system is thought to be a factor, as well. Also, it’s thought that defects in the skin barrier contribute to eczema. These defects can allow moisture out through the skin and let germs in.

Trigger Factors-

  • Stress
  • Contact with irritating substances such as woolen and synthetic fabrics and soap
  • Heat and sweat
  • Cold, dry climates
  • Dry skin

Symptoms

  • Dry, sensitive skin
  • Intense itching
  • Red, inflamed skin
  • Recurring rash
  • Scaly areas
  • Rough, leathery patches
  • Oozing or crusting
  • Areas of swelling
  • Dark colored patches of skin

7 types of eczema

  • Atopic dermatitis
    The most common form of eczema. It usually starts in childhood, and often gets milder or goes away by adulthood.
  • Contact dermatitis
    If you have red, irritated skin that’s caused by a reaction to substances you touch, you may have contact dermatitis.
  • Dyshidrotic eczema
    This causes small blisters to form on your hands and feet. It’s more common in women than men.
  • Hand eczema
    Eczema that only affects your hands is called hand eczema.
  • Neurodermatitis
    This is similar to atopic dermatitis. It causes thick, scaly patches to pop up on your skin.
  • Nummular eczema
    This type of eczema causes round, coin-shaped spots to form on your skin.
  • Stasis dermatitis
    It happens when fluid leaks out of weakened veins into your skin. This fluid causes swelling, redness, itching, and pain.

Self help

  • Apply cool compresses to your skin, or take a colloidal oatmeal or baking soda bath to relieve the itch.
  • Moisturize your skin daily with a rich, oil-based cream or ointment to form a protective barrier against the elements.
  • Apply the cream right after you get out of the shower or bath to seal in moisture.
  • After you bathe, gently blot your skin with a soft towel. Never rub.
  • Avoid scratching. You could cause an infection.
  • Use fragrance-free detergents, cleansers, makeup, and other skin care products.
  • Wear gloves and protective clothing whenever you handle chemicals.
  • Wear loose-fitting clothes made from soft fibers, like cotton.

Home Remedies

  • Vegetable Shortening-
    This thick, greasy kitchen staple is perfect to apply topically to dry, cracked skin to help it heal. Coat the affected area, cover with plastic wrap and secure with surgical tape. Try to leave the wrap on for 2-4 hours to let the moisturizer sink in. If possible, repeat daily until rash calms.
  • Bath “Recipes-
    Add a cup of vegetable or mineral oil to a warm bath to moisturize and soothe dry skin.
    Another home remedy is mixing 2 teaspoons olive oil with a glass of milk and adding it to your bath water. Oatmeal baths are also well known for soothing itch. Grind a few handful of plain oatmeal (not flavored or instant) in a blender or food processor, then sprinkle the fine powder over your bath water. Adding 1-3 cups of magnesium-rich Epsom salts will help reduce itching and remove scales. Also add a teaspoon of lavender essential oil for its soothing and healing properties.
  • Turmeric-
    Take in about a teaspoon of turmeric every day. It has a subtle, citrusy flavor that works well in rice, veggies, pasta, and other cooked meals.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar-
    You can use cotton balls to apply the vinegar directly to scaly areas, or apply to larger areas with a clean paper towel dipped in 1 part vinegar to 1 part water. Note: Do not use this remedy if your skin is cracked or bleeding, as the vinegar will sting and irritate the are.
  • Olive Oil-
    Try rubbing some warm olive oil into affected areas of the skin to soften scaly patches. If psoriasis is affecting your scalp, try working some olive oil into your scalp while showering to loosen and remove the dried skin. Adding olive oil to your diet can also help heal your skin from the inside out.
  • Flaxseeds-
    Grind up a few tablespoons of flaxseed and add to smoothies, oatmeal, granola, or salads. You can also use flaxseed oil as a dressing for salads and veggies.
  • Tea Tree Oil-
    Rub a few drops of tea tree oil, diluted in a little olive oil, into your dry skin or psoriasis patches several times a day. The Australian remedy is useful for relieving itch and softening plaques, especially if you have a mild case.
  • Aloe Vera-
    apply the gel on skin
  • Baking Soda
    Mix 1 1/2 cups of baking soda with 3 gallons of water. Use a washcloth to apply the mixture to itchy skin for quick relief.
  • Fish Oil-
    Meanwhile, olive oil, flaxseed, nuts, and fatty fish, such as salmon, sardines, herring, mackerel, and tuna are all good natural sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Aim for at least three 3 to 4 ounce servings of canned fatty fish per week. Note: omega-6 fatty acids, found in safflower, sunflower, and corn oil, have been shown to worsen inflammation

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